Instructions for using tools and data

Observed and projected climate

Maps

The map to the left shows average values for the baseline period (1971-2000) according to the municipal division of 2011.

The map to the right shows the climate model forecast for the variable you selected for the period you selected, as an average based on 19 climate models. The values are sliding 30-year averages. The material is interpolated on a 10x10km grid square.

More detailed information on grid material is available in the section Climate Change Explained

There are three emission scenarios to choose from: A2, high emissions; A1B, fairly high emissions and B1, low emissions.

You can change the time period of the map to the right by clicking the grid below the map. The orange beam will move to the chosen location. 

Diagrams

The grid below the maps shows regional time series from 1961 on a blue curve. The values are annual and monthly averages interpolated on a 10x10km grid square, based on meteorological observations.

More detailed information on grid material is available in the section Climate Change Explained

The three evenly rising curves describe the average values of 19 climate models for regional mean temperature and precipitation as 30-year sliding average according to various emission scenarios from the period 1961-1990. The red curve corresponds to scenario A2: high emissions; the light green to scenario A1B: fairly high emissions and the dark green to scenario B1: low emissions. The scenario selected on the map is shown as a thicker line on the graph, the two other options are narrower.

Move the pointer on top of the graphs to see the exact numerical value and year.

Menus

Use the menus below the maps to select the aspects to be shown on the maps and graphs.

Area: Select the municipality you wish to examine. Borders of the municipality are highlighted on the map, the graph shows a time series based on meteorological observations and climate model forecast for the municipality in question. Municpal division is according to the year 2011.

Time: You can view average temperatures and precipitation per year or per month.

Variable: you can choose mean temperature or precipitation.

Value/change: On the map, you can examine climate model assessments on future mean temperature/precipitation or how much mean temperature/precipitation will change in comparison with current climate (average for 1971/2000). 

  • Value: The map to the left shows the average mean temperature/precipitation for 1971-2000, and to the right is the climate model forecast for the same variable for the 30-year period of your choice. The 30-year period of the map to the right can be changed by clicking the grid below the maps. The orange beam will move to the chosen location on the time axis. The blue curve is the municipality-specific mean temperature/precipitation based on meteorological observations, while the red and green curves are climate model forecasts according to various emission scenarios.
  • Change: The map to the left shows the mean temperature/precipitation for 1971-2000 and to the right, the change in temperature/precipitation for the 30-year period of your choice in comparison with the level for the period 1971-2000. The 30-year period of the map to the right can be changed by clicking the grid below the maps. The orange beam will move to the chosen location on the time axis. The blue curve is the municipality-specific mean temperature/precipitation based on meteorological observations, while the red and green curves are climate model forecasts according to various emission scenarios.

Scenario: you can choose between three scenarios of how conditions will change in future, based on the climate models. The pessimistic scenario A2: high emissions corresponds to a situation where the transfer from fossil fuels to emission-free energy sources is slow, whereas the scenario B1: low emissions corresponds to a situation where emissions are cut drastically and rapidly. The scenario A1B: fairly high emissions is the intermediate form between the two extremes.