Video: Drained peatlands can act both as sinks and sources of carbon

Drained peatlands cover vast areas in Finland, and as they can both absorb and emit carbon dioxide, they affect significantly the carbon balance. Measurements at a drained nutrient-poor peatland in Southern Finland showed the carbon balance to be negative, or the forest to be a carbon sink. In addition to the tree stand, also the carbon stock of the peatland grew. The results are surprising as the forestry-drained peatlands are commonly thought to release more carbon than the growing tree stand can absorb.[1]

Interviewee: Researcher Annalea Lohila, Finnish Meteorological Institute

Video length: 5:10 min

Language: Finnish, with English subtitles

Recorded: 8.7.2013

Published: 26.9.2013

Terms of use: The video is freely usable for non-commercial purposes, such as education. Climateguide.fi website and the producer of the video should be mentioned as reference.

For courses in Finnish upper secondary schools: BI1, BI3, GE1, GE3, KE1 (old) -> BI1, BI2, GE2, GE1, KE1 (new curriculum/OPS)

Filmed by: Riku Mesiniemi ja Anna Puustinen

Production: The video is produced by the Finnish Meteorological Institute as part of project TULUVAT funded by the Finnish National Board of Education.

References

  1. Lohila, A., Minkkinen, K., Aurela, M., Tuovinen, J. P., Penttilä, T., Ojanen, P., & Laurila, T. 2011. Greenhouse gas flux measurements in a forestry-drained peatland indicate a large carbon sink. Biogeosciences, Volume 8, Number 11: 3203-3218 http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-8-3203-2011

Authors